Jamaican Ludo 80’s Reggae Queens Edition

$59.99

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Culturally inspired Jamaican Ludo board! Grab a piece of Jamaican History with this Jamaican Ludo 80’s Reggae Queens Edition game board! Instantly connect with over 10 generations of entertainment in one beautifully designed and simple game. Different game modes allow for a super fun game-play, more challenging or an easy run home! You’re sure to feel immersed in family and multi-player action as you team up or become the dominant player on the board. Each board is professionally made from solid wood and hardboard materials. This allows for a durable board game able to withstand the test of time, as well as a printed inner finish able to stand the test of spills with an easy clean. The game originated in India and made its way around the world in modified form. Each culture modified the game into various designs, but none compares to the larger playing area in the Jamaican Ludo edition.

Marcia Griffiths

Born in West Kingston, Jamaica, Griffiths started her career in 1964, performing on stage with Byron Lee and the Dragonaires at the behest of Phillip James of The Blues Busters, who had heard her singing in her home neighbourhood. Her performance was sufficiently impressive that the following day Ronnie Nasralla and Clement Dodd both offered her recording contracts. She chose to record for Dodd’s Studio One label, where she recorded a series of duets with male singers such as Tony Gregory (“You’re Mine”), Bob Marley (“Oh My Darling”), Jeff Dixon (“Words”), and Bob Andy (“Always Together”), with whom she would have a relationship lasting several years. In 1968 she had her first success as a solo artist, with “Feel Like Jumping”, which like her other early Studio One solo hits (including “Truly” and “Melody Life”), were written by Andy.

From 1970 to 1974, she worked together with Bob Andy as a duo (Bob and Marcia), on the Harry J label. She also recorded for Lloyd Charmers.

Between 1974 and 1981, she was a member of the I Threes, a trio of backing singers, which supported Bob Marley & the Wailers. She continued to record as a solo artist throughout the 1970s, working with producers such as Sonia Pottinger, and Joseph Hoo Kim.

In 1983, she released her re-recording of the Bunny Wailer song “Electric Boogie”, originally recorded and released by Wailer in 1976. Although the 1983 version became a minor hit for Griffiths, the song was remixed in 1989, and it was this version that made the Electric Slide, a line dance, an international dance craze.It reached number 51 on the US Billboard Hot 100, making it her most successful single. It is currently the highest-selling single by a female reggae singer of all time. She has more recently had further hits with producer Donovan Germain.

She had two children with JBC disc jockey Errol Thompson, and raised them alone after his death in 1983.

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Judy Mowatt

Mowatt was born in Gordon Town, St. Andrew Parish, Jamaica. At the age of 13, she became a member of a dance troupe which toured Jamaica and other islands in the Caribbean. Her initial ambition was to become a registered nurse. Her earliest musical influences were Aretha Franklin, Otis Redding, Curtis Mayfield, Dionne Warwick, Bob Marley, Marcia Griffiths, The Staple Singers and The Soulettes. A coincidental meeting with two teenage girls who were earlier in her dance troupe led to the formation of the Gaylettes, in 1967.

Career
In 1974, Mowatt got her big break by joining Bob Marley’s backing vocal trio the “I Threes”.

Her Black Woman album (Ashandan, 1979) came out the same year as I Three member Marcia Griffiths’s album At Studio One. It is considered by many critics to be the greatest reggae album by a female artist. It was also the first reggae album recorded by a woman acting as her own producer.

She became the first female singer nominated for a Grammy Award in the category of reggae music when her Working Wonders album was nominated in 1985.[citation needed]

Formerly a member of the Rastafari movement, in the late 1990s she converted to Christianity and now sings Gospel music.

In 1999 the Jamaican government made her an Officer of the Order of Distinction for “services to music”.

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Sister Nancy

Sister Nancy, aka Muma Nancy, real name Ophlin Russell, (born on 2 January 1962) is a Jamaican dancehall DJ and singer. She is known to the world as the first female dancehall DJ and was described as being a “dominating female voice for over two decades” on the dancehall scene.

One of her most famous songs is “Bam Bam”, labeled as a “well-known reggae anthem” by BBC and a “classic” by The Observer.

Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Russell was one of 15 siblings. Her elder brother, Robert, is better known as Brigadier Jerry, and by her mid-teens, she would occasionally perform on the Twelve Tribes of Israel soundsystem Jahlovemuzik sound system that she worked with, and worked for three years on the Stereophonic sound system with General Echo. Sister Nancy was born in a conservative household in Kingston. She was expected to perform conservative duties such as being an elder of the community and promote socially conservative values such as staying in the household, be drug-free, and family oriented. Early on, she rebelled against her traditional values and followed her brother Brigadier Jerry in DJing. She was repeatedly dissuaded from DJing and encouraged to pursue Christian music by her father. When she was a teenager, she got into Dancehall. She was the only girl to show up to dance. The family norms did not appeal to her and she ran away from home for months at a time. Nancy followed DJ Junior Chalice around Jamaica and in St. Thomas was given a chance by him to DJ. She is quoted from an interview as saying, “Me never nervous again after that. That was 15. When I was 16 I say, ‘Alright, I go step up me thing.'” In 1980, producer Winston Riley was the first to take her into the studio, resulting in her first single, “Papa Dean” for his Techniques label. Russell-Myers went on to perform at Reggae Sunsplash, making her the first female deejay ever to perform there, and she is also the first female Jamaican deejay to tour internationally. She had further success with singles such as “One Two”, “Money Can’t Buy Me Love”, “Transport Connection” and “Bam Bam”. Her debut album, One Two was released in 1982. She went on to work with producer Henry “Junjo” Lawes, recording “A No Any Man Can Test Sister Nancy”, “Bang Belly”, and a collaboration with Yellowman, “Jah Mek Us Fe A Purpose”. She continued to appear live, sometimes on Jahlove Music with her brother. The sound system toured internationally, with both Sister Nancy and Brigadier Jerry making their debut UK performances at the Brixton Town Hall, London in 1982.

Despite his first album being released after hers, Sister Nancy claims her brother as her main inspiration and supporter. His stage presence and voice projection have clearly influenced Sister Nancy’s work and career. Aspects of his rolling vocal pattern, sing jay style, expressive performances, and culturally conscious lyrics are found in much of Sister Nancy’s music. Much like her brother, she also focuses on cultural issues and has a spiritual tone as well in many of her tracks. Unlike his sister however, Brigadier Jerry was never really able to capture his exceptional live performances on a recorded track that was on par. Today he still puts out the occasional single and tours somewhat regularly.

Each culture modified the game into a more fun past time for family and friends. In Jamaica, the flavor of this game is even more fun and addicting. Larger game board and playing space allowing for unlimited variations. Various modes of play, from strategy to just pure fun! Different modes of game-play listed in the accompanying manual. Very easy game to play and enjoy.

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Rita Marley

Alpharita Constantia Marley OD (née Anderson; born 25 July 1946) is a Cuban-born Jamaican singer and the widow of Bob Marley. She was a member of the vocal group the I Threes, along with Marcia Griffiths and Judy Mowatt, who gained recognition as the backing vocalists for Bob Marley and the Wailers.

Rita was born in Santiago de Cuba, to Leroy Anderson and Cynthia “Beda” Jarrett. She grew up in the upper level of Beachwood Avenue, located in Kingston, Jamaica. In her book No Woman No Cry: My Life with Bob Marley, she describes how she was raised by her Aunt Viola on Greenwich Park Road.

In the mid-1960s, Rita met Bob Marley after meeting Peter Tosh. After it was learned that she was a singer, she was asked to audition for the Soulettes. The group included Rita, her cousin Constantine “Dream” Walker, and Marlene “Precious” Gifford[citation needed]. Bob Marley, then a member of the Wailers vocal trio along with Bunny Livingston and Peter Tosh, became the group’s mentor and manager and through working together, he and Rita fell in love.

Soulettes released recordings include rocksteady tunes such as “Time for Everything”, “Turn Turn Turn” (released in 1966, this was a cover of The Byrds’ hit song based on a Bible quote, which was originally written by folk singer Pete Seeger) and “A Deh Pon Dem”. “Friends and Lovers”, “One More Chance” and “That Ain’t Right” (featuring harmony vocals by the Wailers), as well as a duet by Rita and Bunny Livingston, “Bless You” were issued years later on the Lovers and Friends album.

After those recordings for the Studio One label coached by Bob, Rita married Bob Marley around February 1966, just before her husband moved to Wilmington, Delaware (USA) for a few months to make a living working at the Dupont Hotel there. Bob was replaced by Constantine “Vision” Walker, who recorded a few songs as a member of The Wailers during this period.

Weight 5 lbs
Dimensions 24 × 24 × 2 in

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